The YOUValde Blog

Stories from the people, places and experiences that create the diverse and uncovered adventure in Uvalde! 


April 18, 2022

 

“You can use these things to make a mojito”

Get to know your Texas wildflowers with Spring in full swing!

By Uvalde Convention and Visitors Bureau Staff    Only In Uvalde

You know the saying: April showers bring May flowers. 

That’s all well and good, but in Texas, we get excited in April for wildflowers. We look early for those vibrant plants that paint our highways, resulting in a beautiful tapestry that would make Claude Monet jealous. 

This is especially true in the Uvalde area, where we have an abundance of fantastic flora that appeal to all interests. We mean it when we say that Uvalde has always been an area rich in little-known, but unique and important aspects that are exclusive to not only Texas, but to our little corner of the Lone Star State. That extends to the wildflowers that visitors can take a gander at during this colorful time of year. 

But these flowers aren’t just colors peppering the landscape. There is SO much more to them.

Here are some wildflowers to keep an eye out for as you navigate your way through the Uvalde area. When you see one of these, spout off your newfound knowledge and impress your traveling buddies. Don’t fault them for not knowing as much as you. Some of us are late bloomers.

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Left to Right, Top to Bottom: Indian Blanket, Texas Bluebonnet, Pink Evening Primrose, Winecup, Mexican Hat, Lemon Mint

  1. Pink Evening Primrose: Also known as Pink Ladies, these subtle yet charming beauties are 1 ½ ft. perennials that travel in bunches, AKA spread in colonies, making for a perfectly pink canvass to please the eye. They’re resilient little ones, too, as they are known to be drought resistant. In Texas, their flowers open in the morning and close in the evening. 
  2. Winecup: Whether you’re a pinot grigio or cabernet sauvignon (or just simply red or white wine) fan – or even scotch/beer – anyone can appreciate the vivid color that this flower richly boasts. While they do don a purplish-red most of the time, they have been known for some shades of white (There’s that red v. white debate again). 
  3. Mexican Hat: Don’t do a hat dance around them, please! You might step on them. While you can see them in the spring, they can also bloom for up to two months in the summer. They were also known to be used for medicinal purposes by Native American tribes for multiple types of illnesses. 
  4. Lemon Mint: You’d think these things would be yellow. Because, you know…lemon. But the cool part? You can use these things to make a mojito. They’re that delicious. We’re not recommending picking a random one off the side of the road and doing it. But just a fun fact! Be careful if you do approach these bad (minty) boys. Bees REALLY love their flavor, too. 
  5. Indian Blanket: They do give off a warm, cozy feeling don’t they? Belonging to the daisy family, these live up to their true name by giving off red and yellow vibes, much like that of some traditional Native American blankets. As if they didn’t provide enough color (#sarcasm), they also are very popular amongst butterflies. 

BONUS! Texas Bluebonnet: You didn’t think we’d forget this one, did you? The Official Flower of Texas HAD to be included in this list. But we had to make you work for it! While they’re everywhere on Texas roads, they are quite hard to establish if you want these blue gems to sprout in your garden. It could take several years, in fact. But hey, you historians know that Texas took a while to form into the great state it is today. It’s worth it. These Lone Star treasures (which also come in red and white, like the state flag) were made the official Texas flower in 1901 by the Texas Legislature. 

About the Uvalde Convention and Visitors Bureau: 

The Uvalde Convention and Visitors Bureau is a tourist and visitors center that provides help and assistance with any needs like maps, directions, brochures of the Uvalde area, and helps support tourism growth in the city. The independent 501(c)(6) also oversees Main Street Uvalde and the Ssgt. Willie De Leon Civic Center. Uvalde has always been a town rich in little-known, but unique and important Texas history. Now known by a variety of well-earned monikers, the area has since developed into a rising corner of Texas that boasts a wide range of activities for adventure seekers across the board and of all kinds. Whether you’re looking to become enlightened about rarely-explored Texas history and folklore, go on a river floating expedition, take a hill country hike, hunt, drive a tank, shop and dine, host a business retreat, or go on a safari, the city and the Uvalde Convention and Visitors Bureau can provide your travels with a thriving tourism hub that is surrounded by and filled with diverse and uncovered adventure.

 


April 7, 2022

 

“Don’t be a hero…” Golfing weather has arrived. Here’s what you can do to help your game. 

By Uvalde Convention and Visitors Bureau Staff    Only In Uvalde

There’s a coyote on the golf course. And that’s a good thing.

Especially one so used to winning, and one that can help you – the avid or novice golfer – improve your game. 

The sport came naturally to Tate Bradham, a Uvalde High School alum who grew up in Tree City. A golfing aficionado and former golf pro at the Frio Valley Ranch Golf Club in Concan, he recently sat down with the Uvalde Convention and Visitors Bureau, and allowed for a brain-picking session to help visitors and residents alike elevate their game. 

One may want to pay attention to what he has to say. Because for Bradham, the fairway called to him shortly after he came out of the womb. 

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UVALDE MEMORIAL GOLF COURSE

“My parents used to be able to put me in my walker (as a baby), and put me in front of the TV to watch the Golf Channel,” Tate reminisced while laughing. “They could do whatever they wanted around the house, and I’d just stay silent. I was enamored by it.”

A graduate of Professional Golfers Career College with a degree in Professional Golf Management (how cool is that?), he has found success at every corner of his life’s golfing journey – including a signature victory in his senior year at UHS, winning the Coyote Invitational in 2002. 

Bradham seemingly lives and breathes golf in every aspect of his daily life, even giving his expertise to the CVB with a “Uvalde Golf” hat nestled proudly onto his head. What better person to get small tidbits that can make a world of difference when you hit the links? 

With the 2022 Master’s around the corner, pro golf’s premier tournament signals the unofficial start of prime golfing weather around the country. The weather is warming up to all shades of 80 and 90 degrees in the Southwest Texas spring, the clubs never looked so tempting, and golf courses in the Uvalde area never looked so picturesque. 

If you decide to gather up your clubs and trek to either the Concan or Uvalde golf courses, there are a few things you could gather from Bradham before you even stretch on the first hole.

Oh, and if you go out for a round or two, Bradham says to be wary of the legendary 14th hole at the Frio Valley Ranch Golf Club. According to him, that Par 3 is nothing to laugh about. 

“You have a bunker to the left, but it’s almost like an island green,” he cautioned. “You can’t bail out right. You hit it too long, you’re in a gully. You hit it too short, you’re in a gully. It’s a 185-190 yard shot, but it’s intimidating.” 

Maybe skip that beer at the 13th hole to mentally prepare yourself.

But for now, here are five fast, basic golf tips from Bradham you may not have considered: 

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  1. The Swing: Think baseball – kinda. You would agree that most people in their life play baseball, correct? You take the baseball swing against the golf swing – both are kind of on the same level, but on a different plain. With the baseball swing, your lower body would clear before your shoulders would. In golf, you want the lower body to hang back just a little bit. You want the shoulders and the lower body to work more in a motion than just in two pieces.
  2. The Slice: Chicken wing isn’t a good thing. Basically that means your right elbow, for a right handed player, is coming up during your backswing. If your elbow is up, the only way to swing is to come out-to-in. If you do that with an open club face, you’re going to put a left-to-right swing on the ball. That’s where your slice is coming from. You always want to think about hitting just on the inside of the golf ball. That’ll keep your club down the path of motion. Take a sharpie out to the driving range, mark a dimple on the ball, and when you put it on the ground or on the tee, have that dimple just to the inside. You want your club head to hit that dimple. Aim small, miss small.
  3. A Bad Drive: Don’t be a hero. Never try to hit the hero shot (after a bad drive off the tee). Just get the ball back into play. It’s just one shot. You can compound the situation by trying to hit the hero shot, and the next thing you know, you’re three or four shots deep before you actually get the ball back in play.
  4. The Sand Trap: Not a beachin’ good time. I’ve always taught (how to get out) to where you want to open yourself up and get your body out of the way. How you can do that is before you take your swing, you want to open the club, then grip the club. Then basically, imagine you take a dollar bill, then put that in the sand. Put the ball on top of that dollar bill. You want to hit the dollar bill and the golf ball, so that you hit two inches behind the ball. So it’s more of a splashing motion. 
  5. The Bottom Line: Simplify. You’ve heard of the term paralysis by analysis? Instead of filling your head with so much information that you can’t remember this or that, think of the little important pieces and fall back on those. The best instruction book that I’ve ever read in my life is Harvey Penick’s Little Red Book. The simplicity of how he explains everything is helpful. That book can be used by golf pros all over the world, or beginners just picking up the golf clubs. 

To learn more about the Uvalde Golf Course, click here. 

To learn more about the Frio Valley Ranch Golf Club, click here.

About the Uvalde Convention and Visitors Bureau: 

The Uvalde Convention and Visitors Bureau is a tourist and visitors center that provides help and assistance with any needs like maps, directions, brochures of the Uvalde area, and helps support tourism growth in the city. The independent 501(c)(6) also oversees Main Street Uvalde and the Ssgt. Willie De Leon Civic Center. Uvalde has always been a town rich in little-known, but unique and important Texas history. Now known by a variety of well-earned monikers, the area has since developed into a rising corner of Texas that boasts a wide range of activities for adventure seekers across the board and of all kinds. Whether you’re looking to become enlightened about rarely-explored Texas history and folklore, go on a river floating expedition, take a hill country hike, hunt, drive a tank, shop and dine, host a business retreat, or go on a safari, the city and the Uvalde Convention and Visitors Bureau can provide your travels with a thriving tourism hub that is surrounded by and filled with diverse and uncovered adventure.